Tuesday, November 15, 2011

MedImmune RSV/Preemie Awareness Blog Tour

20100629_31
I really wanted in on this Mom Central blog tour because it is a subject that means a lot to me.

20100629_32Our little man has had a few tough illnesses for such a little guy. He just turned two in August and we have had to deal with Pyloric Stenosis and RSV! The nurses just loved him and always commented on what a good boy he is!  God must have been looking down on him because he never seemed to suffer as they poked and prodded and did the surgery.  Even though he seemed to do so well, watching him go through thee Pyloric and RSV was heartbreaking! But believe me, we know how lucky he is. With the RSV, they were able to send him home with the respirator.

What is RSV disease? Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common, easily spread virus that almost all children catch at least once by the time they turn 2. RSV disease usually causes moderate-to-severe cold symptoms. However, for some babies, complications from RSV disease can lead to a serious lung infection.Call your baby's doctor if your baby has any of these problems:
  • Coughing or wheezing that does not stop
  • Fast breathing or gasping for breath
  • Spread-out nostrils and/or a caved-in chest when trying to breathe
  • A bluish color around the mouth or fingernails
  • A fever (in infants under 3 months of age, a fever greater than 100.4°F rectal is a cause for concern)
RSV-Infographic1
Lungs, heart, and RSV disease
A baby may appear healthy, yet
still have injured lungs.

Chronic Lung Disease (CLD) is the result of a baby's lungs getting irritated or inflamed. Babies may need a machine called a ventilator to help them breathe. Pressure from a ventilator can sometimes irritate the fragile lungs of these babies, which can cause CLD. CLD may also develop in babies who have received high levels of oxygen for a long time or have had pneumonia.Because their lungs are not normal and may still be healing, babies with CLD are at increased risk for severe RSV disease.
What is RSV season?
RSV season is the time when your baby is most likely to catch RSV. In most parts of the country, RSV season runs from fall into spring. RSV activity in your area may vary season to season. RSV season might start and end at different times in different parts of the country.
Find out, based on CDC data, when RSV season started and ended in '08-'09 where you live. Then talk to your pediatrician about how to help protect your baby. In Florida, In the '08-'09 season, RSV season began in July and ended in February.
What can you do about RSV disease?
RSV spreads just like a common-cold virus. Taking a few extra precautions around your family and friends can help protect your baby.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before touching your baby, and ask others to do the same
  • Don't let anyone smoke in your home, or near your baby
  • Wash your baby's toys, clothes, and bedding often
  • Keep your baby away from:
    - Crowds and young children
    - People with colds

Frequently asked questions
The more you know about severe RSV disease, the more you can recognize the symptoms of RSV disease and help protect against it.
What is RSV season?
Like the flu or common-cold virus, RSV is a seasonal virus. The start of the season varies from one part of the country to the next, but it usually starts in the fall and continues into the spring. In different parts of the country, the length of the RSV season may be different. To find out when the RSV season starts in your area, talk to your baby's healthcare provider.
Is my baby at high risk for severe RSV disease?
Most babies with RSV suffer from moderate-to-severe cold symptoms. But in some cases, RSV disease can be more serious. Preemies and babies born with certain types of heart disease and those with chronic lung disease are at high risk for severe RSV disease, which could lead to hospitalization due to serious lung infections such as bronchiolitis with or without pneumonia.
What are the symptoms of a severe RSV infection?
  • Coughing or wheezing that does not stop
  • Fast breathing or gasping for breath
  • Spread-out nostrils and/or caved-in chest when trying to breathe
  • A bluish color around the mouth or fingernails
  • A fever. (In infants under 3 months of age, a fever greater than 100.4°F rectal is a cause for concern)
Call your doctor right away if you notice any of the symptoms above.
How easy is it to catch RSV?
Like a common-cold virus, RSV can be spread by sneezing and coughing or by physical contact such as kissing, touching, or shaking hands. RSV can live up to 7 hours on countertops and other surfaces, and spreads very easily in daycare centers and crowded households. No wonder nearly all babies will have had RSV disease by the age of two.
What could put my baby at high risk for severe RSV disease?
Here are some of the main factors that can increase your baby's risk for severe RSV disease:
  • Premature birth. Severe lung infections are more common in preemies born at less than 36 weeks.
  • Having chronic lung disease. Babies 24 months of age or younger at the start of RSV season who have been treated for chronic lung disease within the past 6 months are at high risk.
  • Being born with certain types of heart disease. Babies 24 months of age or younger at the start of RSV season who were born with certain types of heart disease are at high risk.
  • Risk factors for premature infants may include:
  • Young chronological age (≤12 weeks of age) at the start of RSV season
  • Being around other children at daycare.
  • Family history of wheezing or asthma.
  • Exposure to tobacco smoke and other air pollutants. Never let anyone smoke around your baby.
  • Multiple births. Twins, triplets, and other multiples are often premature and have a low birth weight.
  • Low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds).
  • Crowded living conditions.
  • Pre-school or school-aged sibling(s).

World Prematurity Day
Honor the million babies worldwide who died this year because they were born too soon, and the 12 million more who struggle to survive. November 17 is World Prematurity Day and when we focus everyone’s attention on the serious problem of premature birth.
“Like” World Prematurity Day on Facebook. Read stories from around the world and share your own. Help spread the word by updating your Facebook status with a message on premature birth. Together we can raise awareness of this serious problem and help more babies start healthy lives.

I wrote this review while participating in a blog tour by Mom Central Consulting on behalf of MedImmune and received a promotional item to thank me for taking the time to participate.




Two ways to keep up with the latest  features: "Like" our page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter





Post a Comment